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Hip Pain Causes

Hip Pain | Hip Pain Symptoms | Hip Pain Causes | Hip Pain Treatment

Common Causes of Hip Pain: 
  •     Injuries from sports activities, falling down, slipping on ice, or car accidents.
  •     Disease resulting in a broken or deteriorated bone, irritated bursae, or worn cartilage. Damaged cartilage leads to various forms of arthritis.
  •     Arthritis. The three most common types are Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid arthritis and Traumatic arthritis. When the cartilage thins out and breaks down, unprotected bone surfaces rub against each other and cause extreme pain.

 

Hip Joint Pain from Injuries

Serious hip injuries, dislocations or fractures can lead to a condition called Avascular Necrosis - the blood supply to the ball (the ball-shaped piece of bone that fits into the socket of the hip) portion of the thighbone is cut off and the bone begins to break down causing the cartilage on top of it to collapse. As a result, the surrounding cartilage begins to deteriorate, producing pain and other symptoms

Main Causes:
  •     hip fracture that tears the vessels supplying blood to the head of the femur
  •     steroid medications, such as prednisone and other immune suppressant drugs
  •     chronic asthma
  •     rheumatoid arthritis
  •     lupus
  •     organ transplants & other surgeries


Hip Bursitis usually triggered by injury

Nearly 60 percent of cases of hip pain are caused by hip bursitis - specifically trochanteric bursitis (painful inflammation of the bursa that covers the upper part of the thighbone [femur]).

This form of bursitis can affect anyone, but is more common in women from ages 45 - 80.


Main Causes:

  •     abnormal patterns of walking
  •     standing too long
  •     different length of legs
  •     lying on one side of the body too long
  •     falling from a slip on an icy sidewalk
  •     traumatic & minor accidents
  •     overuse
  •     previous hip surgery or hip replacement
  •     hip replacement
  •     scoliosis or other spinal diseases
  •     rheumatoid arthritis